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The forest is intrinsically linked to the privilege of living in Coastal BC. By forming our homes and raising our families we have left our imprint in this environment. Like us, trees are living things with finite lives and memories embedded in their patterns of growth.

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100 years of the BC lumber industry is mapped graphically into the landscape using 2×6  dimensional boards corresponding in height to the annual harvest of lumber from BC forests. Historic events of local and global significance are identified with colours the graph. World wars, recessions, trade agreements and major events ripple into our industrial prosperity as they ripple through our culture, leaving their mark like a growth-ring in our industrial history.

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The Family Tree is a snapshot of time, taken in 2011 and looking back across a century of inhabitation in coastal BC. This short period resides in living memory and will be carried in the memory of the community’s children. Local residents, young and old are invited to “leave their mark” in the post corresponding to the year of their birth. Each volunteer’s
profile is carved to scale, leaving an impression of the community in 2011.

Inhabiting the piece creates a sensory analog to the experience of playing in a forest inviting the question: How do the archetypes of play inform our relationship to our environment?

Project team: Mark Ashby Architecture with Kate Stefiuk & Travis Warren
Year: 2011
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